Thursday, July 09, 2009

PART FOURTEEN: Read It Before It Is Banned By The US Government


While the public has been made to believe E Pluribus Unum refers to United States citizenship being made up of various ethnicity, what becomes clear when this phrase is interpreted within the mystical context of the Great Seal symbolism is that it could easily refer to one god represented by many names—a god known by various ancient cultures as having walked the earth ‘many’ times under ‘many’ names, yet was ‘one,’ or—E Pluribus Unum. This concept gains persuasion when harmonized with the other two mottoes—Annuit coeptis and Novus ordo seclorum—also taken from ancient texts related to the god Apollo. The motto annuit coeptis is from Virgil’s Aeneid, where Ascanius, the son of Aeneas from conquered Troy prays to Apollo’s father, Jupiter [Zeus]. Charles Thompson, designer of the Great Seal’s final version, condensed line 625 of book IX of Virgil’s Aeneid, which reads, Juppiter omnipotes, audacibus annue coeptis (All-powerful Jupiter favors [the] daring undertakings), to annuit coeptis (He approves [our] undertakings). Was Thompson instructed to do this to conceal the true identity of the ‘He’ of the Great Seal—the mythical father-god Jupiter, who gives Apollo life?

Read the complete article here.


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